Missing ‘The Nutcracker’? How to get your holiday fix at home

We all have our own holiday traditions. Perhaps your radio is watching Rocksets in the Radio Music Hall and staring at the Rockefeller Center tree. Well, this year “Christmas Fantastic” is canceled, and Norway Spruce is just looking sorry (Although the organizers say the tree will be beautiful over time Its lighting on 2 December).

Nevertheless, many rituals take place in this season, reprinted for online viewing. Below is a selection of offerings – some lovely mainstages, some cheeky upstarts – that you can watch from home.

Dance

The company, which introduced America’s first full-length “Nutcracker” in 1944, is now offering what she calls the first “virtual neutrack experience”. Do not expect cutting-edge VR. This is a point-on-click tour of San Francisco’s War Memorial Opera House, with Extras embedded: a printout activity book, a video class about pantomime. Click on the stage screen, and you get a recording of Helgi Tomson’s production of the ballet in 2007. Set in San Francisco in 1915, the version is beautiful, delicious and visually rich, with a second act stuffed with unusual treats. (Available on demand November 27 – December 31, $ 48; sfballet.org.)
Brian SEIBERT

classical music

The saddest of musical seasons is the explosion of Hendel’s “messiah” versions that typically fill New York’s churches and concert halls in December. One of the grandest has been cast by conductor Kent Tritel and the Otorio Society of New York, scaling its large choir as an epidemic-size supplement of 24, with an orchestra of 12, filmed in it. For selecting the fraction taken. The barn of Mr. Tritley’s house is in New York. The soloists are soprano Susanna Phillips, Contralto Heather Petrie, tenor Joshua Blue and baritone Sydney Outlaw. And a cure: for the climactic “Hellelujah” chorus, other Society members will join in from afar. (Livestream on January 10 at 8 pm. On January 10, depending on demand; osny.org.)
ZACHARY WOOLFE

Theater

When a story is about a miser who must learn to share his wealth, its stage adaptation can be difficult. An old Vic production of “A Christmas Carol” is being brought to life from London this month, After a run on Broadway last year, Takes the subject of abundance to the heart, filling the theater with lanterns, bells, ice and food – watch out for parachuting Brussels sprouts! Nor is Jack Thorne’s script, directed by Matthew Warchus, a stent on the terrifying elements that make Andrew Lincoln, After eight years as Rick Grimes on “The Walking Dead” A great alternative to Scrooge. (December 12–24, from about $ 27; oldvictheatre.com.)
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Movies

On top of Tim Burton and Celik the naive citizens of Halloween Town sing, “No fun in life without a good fear” “Nightmare before Christmas.” How perfect they are is better for sugar with a healthy amount of spice. In this stop-motion classic from 1993, skeleton dandy Jack Skellington tried to make Halloween Town a Christmas cheer, with joyous results coming out wrong. The aesthetic universe is so rich that every scene explores new details, and Danny Elfman’s inspired score lands somewhere between Goth Vaudeville and Gilbert and Sullivan. (Disney +.)
Elisabeth Vincentelli

children

You can’t get too much ecological – or merrily irreplaceable – from This production From the Czechoslovak-American Marionette Theater. Expected to face caroling in Swahili, Feziwig sings “The Driedel Song” and represents high-kicking rockets in Eastern European costumes. Wit Horages, the founder of the congregation, does all this with a cast of three dozen wooden puppets, some of which are ancient. (Livestream December 19-January 3; checkmarionettes.org
Laurel graber

Theater

Three years ago, convention-busting, extravagant writer-artist Taylor Mack donned costumes Premiered a concert Rejuvenated the holiday-exclusive style with a punkish cabaret sensibility. Now rated for the virtual era, the show is an ideal pick-up with an intolerance to the season’s usual high-fructose content (but probably not to their young children). Mac will host the live event, she recently debuted the segment at Park Avenue Armory with a socially distant band as well as contributions from various guests and a new animated video. (Livestream at 2 pm, 7 and 10 pm on January 12; On Demand through January 2; taylormacholidaysauce.com.)
Elisabeth Vincentelli

Dance

It is the Gold Standard “Nutcracker”, performed every year by the New York City Ballet, since George Balanchine premiered its version in 1954. Extensive party scenes, trees that grow huge, snow capped snowflakes, children and adults all bring the imagination to the fore. In Tchaikovsky’s music: This year, streaming is the only way to watch everything. The recording, filmed last year but never before broadcast, features Devdrop as Megan Fairchild and Maria Korowski as the Sugar Plant Fairy. (Available on demand December 11-Jan. 3, $ 25; marquee.tv.)
Brian SEIBERT

classical music

Jessie Norman’s warm-up voice made it ideal for Christmas music, in which she brought nobility, but also tenderness. She has some holiday concerts on YouTube, but try this one, Recorded in 1988 at Ely Cathedral outside Cambridge, England. This is not the time for rarities, but for favorites like “Harak”! The Herald Angels sing, “O Holy Night” and “Joy to the World”, all performed in an epic style, as well as “This Christomastide”, written for Norman and perfectly tailored to his rich, rich soprano . (Youtube.)
ZACHARY WOOLFE

Movies

Released in 1944, Vincent Minnelli’s wonderful music was followed by the Smith family for more than a year. The Holiday Part is relatively short, but Judy Garland’s plainly rendition of “Have Yourself a Mira Little Christmas” is the film’s emotional high point. The scene depicts Minnelli’s family, home and roots; While this may sound like fountain conservatism, “Meet Me in St. Louis”, resplendent in Velvet Technicolor, is a beautiful human act about belonging. (On rent or purchase) All major forums.)
Elisabeth Vincentelli

children

Families can virtually travel to the past with this free series from the New York Historical Society. In Come learn about Hanukkah, On 2 December, the children will visit a festive circus in 1916, in which a tenant museum historical interpreter portrays a soldier Jewish teenager. Let’s bake for christmasDecember 18 will include making almond cake from scratch, focusing on the US on 18 December. And young historians can delve into the African-American tradition Let’s celebrate KavanjaOn December 16, which will explore the seven principles of leave. (All programs stream on Zoom at 1 pm; nyhistory.org.)
Laurel graber

Dance

This “nutcracker” uses Tachykowski’s score, remixed in the spot, but transports the story to diverse and contemporary New York with clever hip-hop choreography by Jennifer Weber. A young woman falls in love with a boy selling nuts, and through a short time journey, they rekindle the dance-sparked romance of their estranged parents. In characterization and humor, the show recalls the 1980s family sitcom, and a guest appearance by Curtis Blow adds old-school melancholy. (Available for livestream and on demand Nov. 26-Jan 3, $ 25; stellartickets.com.)
Brian SEIBERT

Movies

This blockbuster surfaced in the summer of 1988, but it takes place on Christmas Eve, and that’s enough Popular action film In a Yule Staple. There are few better ways to spend a holiday afternoon than walking on the couch, watching Bruce Willis at the climax of his high-rises and his non-skilled resources around the fight, led by the ruthless Alan Rickman Fight a gang of thieves. Willis’s gritty cop gets knocked over and over again, but he wakes up again, sending one bad guy after another, and winning back to his changed wife – isn’t that a Christmas feeling? (Hbo.)
Elisabeth Vincentelli

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