Stream these 15 titles before leaving Netflix in November

Fans of Brad Pitt and Jake Gyllenhaal will be disappointed to learn that Netflix is ​​losing not one, but two vehicles for each star to Pitt in November (and more) if you count all the “Ocean’s” movies that Are leaving, at least temporarily). Elsewhere, we have police films, a Broadway musical, a musical documentary (?), Implicit and Oscar nominees Jalore. (Dates recognize that a title will be available on the last day.)

Young filmmakers are often asked to write what they know, and Trey Edward Shults certainly Took that advice to heart: His 2016 debut film is based on the struggles and struggles of his family, many of whom appear as versions of himself in the film. (He also shot the film in his family’s home.) It seems like a formula for microbudgate navel-gazing, but vice versa. Shults’ proximity to the material gives it an unusual intimacy, and while his distinct style – using a visual and aural aesthetic closer to horror cinema than domestic drama – makes it a particularly gratuitous viewing experience. Presents.

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Do you think your pop culture obsession is niche? If so, look for this delightful documentary, one chronicling the archival adventures of Steve Young. A longtime writer for David Letterman, Young’s record store crate took him into the world of “industrial music”: full-scale Broadway-style productions made exclusively for corporate conferences, often by visiting musicians, Provide a good salary for songwriters. And artist. His recording first kills Young as the younger Curious, but the more he learns about this little-known sub-scene, the more fascinated he becomes. Director Deva Vicenant posed questions about Young’s interest and enthusiasm, which separates art from commerce, and who makes that distinction.

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A struggling punk band gets a gig that sounds great – and the writer – director Jeremy Salnier’s claustrophobic, white-knock thriller – proves it. Booked last-minute at an off-the-road maphouse, the bandmates are horrified to find out that they are playing for a white supremacist gang, and are unfortunate when they witness a backstage murder. Actually Becomes ugly. Saulnier plays the claustrophobia of the location as Sache Skinhead lands on his protagonist, creating tension and suspense scenes with skill and ingenuity. But his secret weapon is the great Patrick Stewart, who works against Type as the father of his tortured people.

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The late 1980s and early 1990s were the days of saluting classic television series in films, with decreasing results; There were three or four for every “fugitive,” “Car 54, where are you?” But one of the rare artistic successes was the 1991 director Barry Sonnfeld’s dark comedy, which inspired the spirit of both the supernatural sitcom and the Charles Adams cartoon. Raul Julia and Anjelica Huston are superb as the head of the title family, finding a perfect note of lustful abandonment and dark domestic bliss, while Christina Rikki shines as little Wednesday’s Adams, the best cinematic this side of Buster Keaton Bhajan is playing.

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He is known only as the driver, and all he does is drive – stunt cars by day for movies, drive cars at night for criminals. Ryan Gosling resisted the pleas to convince this enigmatic young man, instead embracing his suspense and effortless calm in this moody, violent neo-noir thriller from director Nicholas Winding Refn. Carrie Mulligan co-stars as a neighbor, garnering her sympathy and trust (and perhaps more), which leads her to work very wrongly, too fast. The performances, which support the top performances of Brian Cranstone, Christina Hendrick, Oscar Issac, and especially Albert Brooks, are unexpectedly effective as a brutal crime boss.

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Jake Gyllenhaal and Michael Peña star as the two Los Angeles operatives in this action drama by writer and director David Ayer (“Training Day”). He is working with material that is meant to keep him sane, not fresh at all: the dynamic of the dude cop, the rival gang wars, the difficulty of honest policing. But he takes a novel approach, producing photographs in a pseudo-documentary format, using personal videos, dash cam footage, and the like. And he sensibly focuses on the by-election between Ginal and Pena, investing their characters with enough depth and genuine affection to keep the film from surrender to formula.

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Directors Jonathan Milot and Carrie Murnion adopted a similarly stylish approach to this 2017 indie action film, which appears as a long-form series, seemingly unbreakable, shot with a tirelessly prowling camera Gone. The redundant (and not entirely far-off) narrative features a nationalist militia under attack on the citizens of Brooklyn, who face gun battles and hands-on combat among the brownies. But the biggest draw is Dave Bautista, who summons just the right mix of offhand skills and reluctance to silence as a former soldier who must fight his demons while fighting for his life.

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Matthew McConaghy got his big break in a lawyer (the 1996 film “A Time to Kill”), so it made sense that when he would need to revive his flagging career, he would play once again. The 2011 adaptation of the Michael Connelly novel features McConaghy as Mickey Holler, a cunning criminal defense attorney who runs his practice from inside his Sneezy Lincoln Town car. This is the perfect role for McConaguhe, who captures the character’s lazy charisma, making his inevitable personal development seem organic. And director Brad Furman knows the kind of film he’s making: an adaptation of the garbage-airport-novel that isn’t meant to win awards, but would have proved a favorable way to pass a lazy afternoon is.

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It was not so unusual, at one time, for genre films to be loaded with social commentary and pointed subtext – which is perhaps why director Neil LaBute’s 2008 thriller makes such an impact. Patrick Wilson and Kerry Washington star as a newlywed couple, whose big move to their dream home is interrupted by their neighbor (Samuel L. Jackson), a Los Angeles police officer, who seems more than a little unstable. The original premise depicts such police-harassment stories as “unlawful entries”, but David Laffrey and Howard Coder’s smart screenplay wrestles with questions of race, class, and police brutality, a general suspense in a thoughtful potbillar Flick can occur.

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It would seem to craft an entertaining film adaptation of Michael Lewis’ dense non-equal account of number-crunching in baseball – too little to make one as attractive and one as charming. But Steven Zillion and Aaron Sorkin’s screenplay finds a fair balance of Egghead theory and character development, Bennett Miller’s direction is fleeting without being lighthearted, Brad Pitt’s restless charisma hardly finds a more appropriate showcase, and The supporting cast (including Joanna Hill, Phillip Seymour Hoffman, Robin Wright and Chris Pratt) is, well, an All-Star team.

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Pitt is equally charming – charming, funny, and cool – in Steven Soderbergh’s star-studded adaptation of the 1960 Raw-Pack-centric Heist portrait. George Clooney as Danny Ocean, a con man (and ex-con) narcissist who goes to hell ripping off a Las Vegas casino magnate (Andy Garcia), who would be paramount to Danny’s ex-wife (Julia Roberts) is. Supporting players (including Matt Damon, Karl Rainer, Bernie Mac, Elliot Gould and Don Cheadle) crawl and pop, while Ted Griffin’s clever script runs with the precision of the Swiss clock. (Its two sequels, “Ocean’s Twelve“And”Ocean’s Thirteen, “Quit Netflix this month too and is well worth your time.”

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Edward James Olmos foiled the Oscar nomination for his eccentric, witty and heartwarming performance as high school teacher Jaime Esclante in this true story of director Ramon Mendez. Escalante was sent to his former Los Angeles school of math classes with only a faint hope to raise the school’s dismal test scores; Instead, she not only gave him coaching to acquire basic math skills but also AP Calculus exam. Menndndez ticked the boxes of the “inspirational teacher” narrative without surrendering it to the cliché, detailing how Escalante used his quirky personality and unwavering faith to push his students.

Stream it here.

The spontaneous adaptation of Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim and Arthur Laurents’ musical music of “Romeo and Juliet,” which updated its setting and story for New York streets and gangs, is one of the grand achievements of the Broadway stage. So it is no surprise that it gave birth to a great film musical. Original stage director and choreographer Jerome Robbins and filmmaker Robert Wise shared directing duties, daringly singing the show and dancing along the real streets of New York City, using the camera to present the story’s longing and loss Using proximity and intimacy. Even more poignant. Natalie Wood and Richard Beamer perform brilliantly in the lead, but Rita Moreno and George Chakiris steal the show in support – and win the Oscar for their efforts, two stunning ten-idol slopes of the film, including Best Picture and Best Director Prizes included.

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Alphonso Cuaron’s 2001 road movie marked his true success as an international filmmaking force – and is one of his best films, being funny and provocative and unexpectedly sexy. Diego Luna and Gail Garcia Bernal (both unknown at the time) star as teenage best friends, convincing an erotic older woman (Maribel Verdu) to join an exotic beach road trip. They think they are in for a week of hedonism, but they have three ideas such as a journey of astonishing tenderness and emotional resonance.

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With David Fincher’s new built-in Netflix feature, “Manc”, on the runway for a December streaming debut, it seems strange that the service is drawing their best picture to date, this 2007 examination of crimes, investigations And the ultimate mystery zodiac killer. Jake Gyllenhaal is a newspaper cartoonist whose casual interest in his case becomes an obsession; Robert Downey Jr. is his columnist co-worker, whose own passion has turned the corner into insanity. Mark Ruffalo cast out as a San Francisco police detective who kept hitting brick walls himself.

Stream it here.

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