‘Threesomes have no “I”‘ review: Monogamy Alternatives

Documentary “There is no ‘I’ in threesomes” (On hbo max) Begins with a couple that have a high diving board. Giddy and holding hands, they kans for the jump.

Director Jan Oliver Lux, who goes by Ollie, and his fiancée Zoe are dipping into an open relationship. Living on opposite sides of New Zealand, the long-distance couple is free to date and sleeps with other people for a year for their marriage. Using iPhones, they would record every experience: Ollie hopes the documentary will make him the poster child for a rich alternative to monogamy.

Ollie and Zoe prove to be a sweet match, but as they do koo and kudal, it can be difficult to root for them. Both are attention-seeking and highly praised for their project, and the home video of their hangout leads to indulgence. They may aim to present Polyamory as Ten and Fulfillment, but it comes more as a risky experiment – especially once Zoe’s Fling evolves into a serious romance with a theater director named Tom Is what strains her bond with Ollie.

But as our central couple’s connection stumbles, the documentary develops into a nuanced examination of perspective. Zoe captures her footage of her time with Tom, yet we begin to see her chasm through Ollie’s eyes. As the film’s director and narrator, Ollie controls the story, and he uses this role to show his jealousy and his hurt. His cleverness culminates in the shocking final work of the documentary, where Ollie shows how the art of filmmaking exposes the lies we tell ourselves about love.

There is no “i” in threesome
Not rated. Running Time: 1 hour 28 minutes. Watch on HBO Max.

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